AR-News: Call-in To Stop Biscuit Sale - July 6

Priscilla Feral feral at friendsofanimals.org
Wed Jun 30 15:05:17 EDT 2004




To: Northeast Activists
From: John Demos, American Lands Alliance -- demos at americanlands.org
Date: June 30, 2004

BUSH FOREST SERVICE PLANNING LARGEST PUBLIC TIMBER SALE IN MODERN HISTORY

PLEASE CALL SENATORS ON TUESDAY, JULY 6th.

The Bush Administration is planning a huge timber sale in Oregon's Siskiyou
Wild Rivers Conservation Area. The rational for the so-called "Biscuit
post-fire recovery project" is another prime example of the Administration's
misuse of the Healthy Forest Initiative.

Details, talking points, a sample letter and contact info are below.

These calls and letters really work.  I have been informed recently by
offices of New Jersey and Rhode Island Representatives, that they have
received large numbers of calls on the Roadless Policy (in one case more
than on Social Security) that have forced them to pay attention to the
issue.


ALERT

Save the Date: Siskiyou Wild Rivers Call in Day -- July 6, 2004

The Bush Administration's Forest Service has planned the largest public
lands timber sale in modern history in the Siskiyou Wild Rivers area in
Southwestern, Oregon.  The Forest Service plans to log 372 million board
feet in the Biscuit post-fire project, filling 70,000 logging trucks.  The
extremely controversial ancient forest areas targeted for logging include
roadless areas, old-growth reserves, and special places such as Silver and
Indigo Creeks in the North Kalmiopsis, the Chetco River and Lawson Creek,
and on Fiddler Mountain.  Logging would take place within the proposed
Siskiyou Wild Rivers Conservation Area.  The project will cost the taxpayers
more than $34 million and will disqualify 48,000 acres from wilderness
eligibility.

The Forest Service has granted an "emergency exemption" for 11 timber sales
of the Biscuit logging project.  This means that once the Records of
Decision come out, the Forest Service can use the exemption to quickly sell
and log the trees during the normal citizen appeal period.  Additionally,
there are rumors that if environmental groups try to block the "emergency
exemption" that some Congressional members may try to attach a rider to an
appropriations bill that would eliminate any chance for environmental groups
to challenge the Biscuit logging project in court.

Your help is needed to stop the largest timber sale in modern history and a
potential rider in Congress.

Take Action to Protect the Siskiyou Wild Rivers Area:
Please help us get the phones ringing off the hook in the US Senate on July
6, 2004.  Please ask your organization's members and/or friends to help in
this effort.

Call in Day:
On July 6, 2004 please call your US Senators at 202-224-3121.  To find out
who your Senators' are please go to: http://www.senate.gov/ . You can also
fax or email your Senator (talking points and a sample letter are provided
below).  To find your Senators' fax and email numbers go to:
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Once you have reached your Senator, ask to speak to the staff that works on
forest issues.  The points to make to the Senator or the staff are:

· ·        Oppose any legislative efforts to exempt the largest timber sale
in history -- the Biscuit post-fire logging project in Southern Oregon -- 
from environmental laws and from judicial review.

· ·        Please protect the Siskiyou Wild Rivers area in southwestern
Oregon as a National Conservation Area for future generations.

· ·        Please urge the Forest Service to protect all ancient forests,
old growth reserves and roadless areas.

Sample Letter:
Dear Senator (put Senator's name here):

As a person who cares about the Siskiyou Wild Rivers area in Southern
Oregon, I do not support the Bush Administration Forest Service's logging
plan in the Biscuit fire area on our public forest.  The Forest Service
plans to log 372 million board feet in the Biscuit post-fire project,
filling 70,000 logging trucks, which amounts to the largest timber sale in
modern history.  The areas targeted for logging include extremely
controversial areas such as roadless areas, old-growth reserves, and special
places such as Silver and Indigo Creeks in the North Kalmiopsis, the Chetco
River and Lawson Creek, and on Fiddler Mountain.  The project will cost the
taxpayers more than $34 million and will disqualify 48,000 acres from
wilderness eligibility.

I believe the Siskiyous should be protected as a National Conservation Area.
I urge you to protect this national treasure and not permit it to be
sacrificed to short term logging interests.

Please actively oppose any legislation or riders that would allow large
scale logging in the Siskiyous and deprive citizens of their right to
participate and use our nation's environmental laws.

The Siskiyou Wild Rivers area is extremely important because of its wild
lands, its wild rivers, its wild salmon and for its famed biological
diversity. Natural recovery rather than post-fire logging will best protect
these values. Burned trees are needed for the recovery of the forests.
Logging them will damage thin soils, cause erosion and retard recovery.
Please keep the Bush Administration from sacrificing the incredible Siskiyou
Wild Rivers area with the largest, most extreme timber sale in Forest
Service history.

Sincerely,
(your name, address)

Additional Talking Points:
· ·        The Siskiyou Wild Rivers Area is one of the most diverse forests
in the nation with healthy salmon runs and fragile, rare plant ecosystems.
It is not a place for a massive logging project.

· ·        The forest is already naturally recovering from the 2002 fire.
Logging will retard its recovery.  This sale is the largest timber sale in
Forest Service history. It would log 370 million board feet. It is the
largest attack on Roadless Areas and would disqualify 48,000 acres from
Wilderness protection.

· ·        The public overwhelmingly opposes this sale. 95% of comments on
the sale oppose the massive logging proposal.

· ·        The Forest Service should protect homes and communities from
fire, not log in the backcountry.

· ·         Instead of focusing on logging, we should remove old logging
roads, thin plantations, rehabilitate fire lines and trails; which would
create over 400 jobs. The proposed logging doesn't make economic sense. The
timber sales would cost more to log than the revenues they bring in. Any
jobs created would be short-lived and out of the area. These won't be "new"
jobs but will substitute for other logging work elsewhere.

Lisa Dix
National Forest Program Director
American Lands Alliance
ldix at americanlands.org
Ph: 202-547-9105; Fax: 202-547-9213


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