AR-News: Animals In Print, 3/24/04

סמדר rumsiki at netvision.net.il
Fri Mar 26 19:37:14 EST 2004



Animals In Print
3/23/04
www.animalsinprint.org


In six years, one female dog and her offspring can produce 67,000 puppies.  A cat and her young can produce 420,000 kittens. Don't litter! SPAY/NEUTER your companion animals




1) IDITAROD , Background introduction, Two articles "Shameles/ bloody bu$ine$$ on
   the backs of man's best friends!!! "
2) WHAT JILL KNOWS,Piddling Poodle Puppy
3) CONGRESS CONSIDERS STEPS TO REDUCE ROADKILL
4) BREAKING NEWS From PETA.org
5) Dogs Adverse Reactions request
6) Update- Animal Sexual Abuse Arkansas Case- LETTERS NEEDED

________________________________________________________________________





Background IDITAROD Story

NOTE:Animals In Print is fortunate and proud to have 
Margery Glickman as a staff member
---------------------------------------------------------------
Victims of cold, fatigue and greed





By Bod Padecky
Press Democrat
March 20, 2004





A dog is there for the taking. He can't talk back. He can't say, stop, you're killing me, you're treating me like a dog. Six years ago, Margery Glickman happened upon a couple of hundred dogs that, if they could have spoken, would have said just that.


Glickman was vacationing in Alaska. She came for the scenery but saw instead a "dog farm." Animals were tethered to stakes by chains, belligerent in their confinement, drinking filthy water, sitting, as she said, "in their own fecal matter." This was a breeding place for the Iditarod. Glickman was perplexed.

Even back home in Miami, Glickman had heard of the Iditarod. It was a 1,149-mile dog sled race in the middle of winter across Alaska. Designed to commemorate the diphtheria run that saved lives in 1925, the Iditarod had become romantic legend, courageous mushers crossing forests, rivers, tundra and mountain ranges with enthusiastic canines. What glory! Ah, but where was the glory in this?

"I was appalled," she said.

Glickman had never been an activist in her life. She was a first-grade teacher. She was a mom. She was in Alaska to relax. Problem was, she couldn't.

"Of 300 dogs on a dog farm," Glickman said, "five might be judged good enough to run in the Iditarod. The rest? Most of them would be culled."

They would be killed, by clubs, by gunshot, by being dragged to death in harness. Some were skinned for parkas and mittens. Her indignation grew in direct proportion to her curiosity. Glickman found dogs working on exercise wheels, like hamsters. She found dogs with muscle tears, raw paws, hypothermia, dislocated joints, penile frostbite, fluid in legs and lungs.

The 32nd running of the Iditarod concludes this weekend, and though records weren't kept for the first 10 years of the race, Glickman now has counted 122 dogs who have died during the last 22 years. She was not alone in her disgust.

"With a buildup of lactic acid and other chemicals from muscle degradation as a result of extreme exercise," said Dr. Paula Kislak, President of the Association of Veterinarians for Animal Rights, "toxicity in the liver and kidneys may not cause death for days or weeks after a race."

So the 122 confirmed deaths?

"Adding the dogs who were culled, died in training and died after the race from complications," Dr. Kislak said, "the number is in the thousands. That is obscene. The race only is run for entertainment and to make money."

Greed is not confined to professional baseball players. The economic impact to Anchorage alone is estimated at $5 million. The Iditarod is a money-maker. Glickman, 56, has launched Sled Dog Action Coalition, a nonprofit volunteer-only organization. She has been so successful, sponsors like Pizza Hut, Pfizer and Costco have dropped out. She has received death threats, enough of them so that she doesn't go to Alaska.

"It is unconscionable," Glickman said. "They (mushers) say they love their dogs, but they don't love their dogs. It is an act of barbarism. It is a shameless, bloody business."

In the Iditarod, dogs are a car tire that goes flat. Just get another one. Except a car tire was never named Lassie or Ol' Yeller. A car tire never welcomed you home at night. A car tire never took the edge off feeling lonely. A car tire never played with the kids, and a kid never cried when the car tire died.

If a dog is man's best friend, this is not how you treat your best friend. You don't push him so hard he can't even exhale to vomit but instead chokes on it while falling down.

And as he watches his dog writhe on the ground, what can the musher possibly say that would even remotely make this sight worthwhile?

Email: padecky at aol.com

__________________________________________________________________






IDITAROD - shameles/ bloody bu$ine$$ on the backs of man's best friends!!!  






The romantics [sled racing dog owners (read:mercenaries!)] pretend this is some extension of a Jack London novel. Hell no. This is a not-so-novel Jack The Ripper crime against man's best friend. It sullies the meaning of sport.
In addition to fluid in the lungs, bleeding stomach ulcers occur, as does general cramping, dislocations, fractures, muscle and tendon tears, tendinitis, dehydration, hypothermia, raw paws, penile frostbite and viruses.>> [To say nothing of the dogs' MENTAL agony...]
 





Two anti-Iditarod articles 






This email contains two anti-Iditarod articles:






What Iditarod Does To Dogs Is True March Madness

by Jeff Jacobs
Hartford Courant
March 18, 2004 






Jonathan XII, a 3-year-old white Siberian Husky who loves to be petted, lives a comfortable lifestyle at an unidentified location 20 minutes from the UConn campus. The shroud of secrecy is necessary, his handler Karen Landwehr said, to prevent merry pranksters from Rhode Island and other rival schools from kidnapping the mascot of our state university.

Personally, I'm not buying the explanation.

I'm convinced Jonathan, the noble heir to a tradition that dates to 1934, is being hidden so he is not drafted into the annual war against dogs. Surely you've heard of the 1,100-mile death march from Anchorage to Nome. It's the grotesque spectacle that alternately bills itself as Alaska's great race and the world's premier dog-sled race.

USA Today columnist Jon Saraceno once called it the "Ihurtadog."

Sportscaster Jim Rome upped the ante to "I-killed-a-dog sled race." 

Nothing trumps death, so just paint me thrilled that the 32nd Iditarod finally, mercifully will end this week.

Early Wednesday morning, Mitch Seavey, 44, won the first prize of $69,000 and a new Dodge pickup truck - hey, a man needs space to cart away his carcasses - by crossing the finish line behind his eight canine slaves in a time of nine days, 12 hours, 20 minutes and 22 seconds.

His dogs were unavailable for comment.

No, not because there isn't a Doctor Dolittle out there who could serve as a pool reporter and get some juicy quotes. It's because, according to an article published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine in 2002, a study showed 81 percent of the dogs that finished the race had abnormal accumulations of mucus and debris that caused injury and inflammation. 

In other words, they were too choked up to comment. Seavey did have plenty to say about his victory and little of it had to do with running the crap out of his dogs over a distance longer than from Hartford to Chicago. To be accurate, Seavey isn't called a dog-beater or abuser or even Master. He is called a musher, which clearly is a word to honor the mush-for-brains who continue to promote and operate this event.

The supporters of this race have the audacity to call the Iditarod a sporting event. The truth is it's closer to the scourging scene in Mel Gibson's new movie.

One more dog dropped dead the other day, bringing the total to at least 122, although there are no official numbers available for the early years. A 7-year-old male named Takk, according to Iditarod officials, died of blood loss associated with gastric ulcers. What the officials didn't say is ulcers are linked to anti-inflammatory drugs frequently used to help mask injury. Yes, the dogs are subject to random drug testing, so you know these folks are, ah, motivated enough to cheat. Takk, on Kjetil Backen's 2004 team, was no ordinary mutt. He was one of the two key lead dogs that carried Robert Sorlie to first place last year. In other words, last year's MVP is this year's maggot meal. 

Backen reportedly was distraught over Takk's death, but he did manage to ask reporters to bring the dog back for him. Wouldn't it be fair if the musher were forced to bring his dead dog to the finish line with him? Or maybe it would be fairer if Snoopy was the musher and a dozen humans were latched together for a little 1,100-mile jog through all terrain, including waist-high water and Godforsaken temperatures. Hey, we would even cut them a break and let them listen to Sam Cooke singing "Chain Gang" in their earmuff-phones. 

Those who would support this race are quick to belittle critics as hysterics or propagandists for PETA, etc. For the record, my wife and I are longtime multiple dog owners and we believe in hardy exercise for robust breeds. These sled dogs are bred to run. A Siberian Husky like Jonathan is a natural, but only part of the equation. All sorts of breeds and mixed breeds are used. In fact, a Siberian is often mixed with a Greyhound for optimum speed and endurance. Of course as competition grows fiercer to improve times, the faster they go, the harder they will fall.

The cruelty is in the vast distance. The cruelty is in some training techniques that would turn your stomach. This doesn't begin to address some manuals that recommend killing dogs that don't cut the mustard. They call it culling. Really, it's murder. The irony is that the Iditarod distance is so long in the first place. The race is patterned after a long-ago emergency supply route to deliver diphtheria serum.

Dogs reportedly have died from being kicked to death. A group of dogs was mangled by a snow-making machine. They've been strangulated. Electrocardiograms to monitor heart problems are now given to the dogs before the race and that's a start, but only a start.

The romantics pretend this is some extension of a Jack London novel. Hell no. This is a not-so-novel Jack The Ripper crime against man's best friend. It sullies the meaning of sport.

What remains of the 87 mushers will be crossing the finish line in the next few days, which also means the killing may not be over. In the meantime, Jonathan XII can park himself in front of the television tonight for the start of UConn's march to the Final Four. This could be a big month for him, the first time both the women and the men win national titles in the same year.

"He's a quiet dog. He hardly ever barks," said Landwehr, a 20-year-old junior majoring in animal science. "He's very mellow, which makes him good with a crowd."

Landwehr is a member of Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed community service fraternity responsible for Jonathan. The last appearances for Jonathan, who Landwehr said is not allowed in the Civic Center, were Senior Nights at Gampel. She brings him to obedience class each week.

"He's a loveable dog, but he's actually quite lazy," Landwehr said. "He likes to lay down in the middle of games."

And that's beautiful.

A dog should be able to enjoy March Madness.

Not be part of it.

E-mail: jjacobs at courant.com
Email editor: letters at courant.com


___________________________________________________________________________






As death toll of dogs rises, so does Iditarod's insanity

Jon Saraceno
USA Today
March 15, 2004







I'm all for mutiny. Dog mutiny, that is.

When it comes to the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race, how do we get more of our furry friends to lie down on the job? If they belonged to a union, there would be a strike every March when the 1,100-mile marathon of dog misery is propelled by more than 1,000 members through the treacherous Alaskan wilderness.

In that labor dispute, I would be all for the stressed-to-the-max dogs. They are overworked and underpaid. The money and the glory go to management — in this case, mushers and their sponsors.

Why does Alaska permit the "Ihurtadog?"

Easy. Commerce — shameless, bloody business carried out on the backs of man's best friends.

Sunday was the scene of more death and despair. A dog belonging to race leader Kjetil Backen of Norway suddenly sat down and died. "It is a real tragedy for him and dog mushing as a whole," race marshal Mark Nordman said at a news conference.

Imagine how the dog felt.

Last week, a 5-year-old dog named Wolf died.

Apologists contend that dogs cannot be made to run, which is true. But many of them sure can be coerced and trained. In the sledders' parlance, mutiny comes when dogs refuse to budge. It already has happened in this year's race, which has featured a fast, grueling pace during unusually warm weather.

More than an estimated 120 dogs have perished during the history of the race, which gives a Humanitarian Award. The number of dog deaths does not include animals that perished afterward — or the thousands that have been injured. Death is merely an occupational hazard — for the dogs. In 1973, the race's first year, the Iditarod took more than 20 days to complete. Two years ago, a speed record was set when Martin Buser finished the race in less than nine days.

Many dogs are dropped during the race because they are unable to continue, but many others continue to trudge on with various injuries.

A couple of years ago, a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical CareMedicine reported that 81% of the 59 dogs they examined after one Iditarod had "abnormal accumulations" of mucus or cellular debris in their lower airways. In addition to fluid in the lungs, bleeding stomach ulcers occur, as does general cramping, dislocations, fractures, muscle and tendon tears, tendinitis, dehydration, hypothermia, raw paws, penile frostbite and viruses.

Not that it's easy on the mushers, either. But, hey, they choose to participate in this frozen insanity. Doug Swingley, who won the race from 1999-2001, was forced to quit from frostbitten corneas last week.

But back to the dogs. Last week, one musher needed an hour to separate three female dogs in heat from their amorous male teammates, according to the Anchorage Daily News — a newspaper no self-respecting salmon would permit itself to be wrapped in.

First, the Daily News is a sponsor. According to the Alaska Journal of Commerce, the newspaper shelled out a minimum of $50,000. The newspaper also is an investor because it reaps advertising dollars.

Invariably, photographs depict warm and fuzzy images of dogs designed to lull readers and placate critics. Imagine the horrors we don't see. Mushers and their teams are not monitored by the media — or anyone else. Likewise, many of the newspaper's syrupy stories seem almost fantasy-like in nature. According to one, four-time Iditarod champion Martin Buser discussed how dogs seem to get into "the zone," as humans report doing during endurance events.

"In the zone, one can smell the sweet scent of success," the Daily News happily wrote.

Think that's what the dogs are sniffing? I smell something else. Money.

The Daily News is not alone among mercenaries in local media. Alaska Newspapers, Alaska Public Radio and an ABC-TV affiliate that bills itself the "Official Television Station of Iditarod 2004" also are sponsors, joining Chevron, ExxonMobil, Coors Brewing and Wells Fargo.

The economic impact to Anchorage, site of the ceremonial start, is estimated at more than $5 million. Organizers increased the size of this year's purse by more than $100,000. The winner gets $69,000 plus a new Dodge pickup. It doesn't require much to buy some folks, even at the expense of living creatures who cannot defend themselves, like poor, old Wolf. 

The dogs, of course, get their usual take.
More suffering.

***

E-mail Jon Saraceno at jons at usatoday.com

source: SledDogAC at aol.com







____________________________________________________________

WHAT JILL KNOWS

Piddling Poodle Puppy







Dear Jill,
Our 10 month old miniature poodle is piddling all over the kitchen floor when we go out.  We have tried putting newspapers down for her to go on, but she won't use them.  We are worried that she will start peeing on our carpeting in other rooms of the house, so we have started closing the door to the kitchen, so she stays in there while we are out.

We have to work during the day and sometimes I don't make it home for lunch.  She drinks a lot of water or something and can't seem to wait until I get home. Sometimes when I do make it home to let her out, she gets so excited she pees indoors.  I don't know if she means to, but it has to stop. After all, she is no longer a baby. Our friend said to take her to a class for dog obedience, and we will but is there something we should be doing meanwhile?  We read your articles and think you're good.  Thank you.
Marcia

Dear Marcia,
A ten month old puppy is still a "baby" dog.  With proper coaching, your miniature poodle puppy can be completely housetrained and paper-trained in a short time.  But first, please take your dog to the vet to rule out any medical reasons for incontinence.  If your poodle passes the veterinarian's inspection, try using commercial "piddle pads" (available at pet-supply stores) instead of newspapers, for times you are not able to make it home.  These pads have a manwhen necessary.  How many hours a day do you leave your dog alone?  Please do not leave your dog all day without walking her or allowing her to "go." 









Love and paw pats,
Jillouise Breslauer
Companion Animal Behavior Consultant
What Jill Knows, Copyright 2003
Syndicated Journal Press Syndicate
e-mail: PetBehaveConsult at aol.com
____________________________________________________________________
 







             CONGRESS CONSIDERS STEPS TO REDUCE ROADKILL:

             Reducing roadkill is just one issue being considered in the 
surface transportation reauthorization bill moving through Congress. The 
Senate included provisions in its bill, S. 1072, aimed at reducing habitat 
fragmentation and wildlife/ vehicle collisions— ultimately saving millions 
of animals while increasing public safety. The Senate provisions would 
require states to formally consider the need for wildlife crossing 
structures (underpasses, culverts, or overpasses) when constructing or 
improving highways -- a critical preventative step in solving the roadkill 
problem. However, as the transportation bill is taken up in the House of 
Representatives, these important wildlife protection provisions may be lost. 
If they are, it will be another six years before we have another opportunity 
to put into law these common sense provisions on behalf of wildlife and 
public safety. In the meantime, millions of animals will lose their lives 
trying to cross highways in search of food and mates, and the very survival 
of many species -- from box turtles to grizzly bears -- will be compromised.

             WHAT YOU CAN DO:

             Please contact your U.S. Representative today. Ask him or her 
to contact Transportation Committee Chairman Don Young and Ranking Democrat 
James Oberstar and urge them to include in the Committee’s transportation 
bill the wildlife crossing provisions approved by the Senate (Section 1501 
of S. 1072). All U.S. Representatives can be reached through the U.S. 
Capitol switchboard: 202-224-3121. You can look up the name of your 
Representative by going online to www.Congress.org, or by calling The HSUS 
at 202-955-3668.






     A Project of The Humane Society of the
United States and The Fund for Animals

             http://www.humanelines.org/






_______________________________________________________







BREAKING NEWS From PETA.org 







Just as PETA was scheduled to testify against the Hawthorn Corporation and its president, John Cuneo, in a federal administrative court, Cuneo admitted guilt in 19 violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act. Cuneo has been ordered to relinquish custody of 16 elephants to USDA-approved facilities—including the elephant Lota, for whom we have long fought—and pay a $200,000 fine. 

For more information, visit PETA.org <http://cl.extm.us/?fe8911787361037877-fe6315737c6606797016>  and see the related article in The Washington Post (free registration required). 

______________________________________








Dogs Adverse Reactions request ........ please pass on  





Dogs Adverse Reactions:  

Per FDA:  "In common terms, an adverse drug experience (ADE) is either an undesired side effect, or the lack of a desired effect. The Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) defines an ADE as 'any side effect, injury, toxicity, or sensitivity reaction (or failure to perform as expected) associated with use of an animal drug, whether or not determined to be attributable to the drug.' " (This means that you need only SUSPECT that the side effect is caused by the drug; you do not have to prove it.)

Now with that knowledge.....  we have started a new website called DogsAdverseReactions.com .  We are looking for stories to post, both as Memorials and Survivors.  You DO NOT have to prove a drug caused a reaction, only suspect it.  But be willing to follow thru with complaints to manufacturer and FDA if not already done.
If you are  not sure how to file the necessary complaints..... please ask and we can help you.  

If you might be interested ........ feel free to contact me.  Or if you would like....  send your story in your words, (no profanity please) with companions picture, birthdate/year and date of passing if passed, plus your permission to post.  Your email will be posted with the story, for others to request further information if they feel your story fits what they are going thru.  A suggestion is to be sure to comment "In My Opinion".

We are a group of people not against any vet or manufacturer, we only want the truth known about different drugs that we have a right to be informed of, before given to our companions. 

Please check out:  http://www.petitiononline.com/ProHeart/petition.html

Sincerely,
Dogs Adverse Reactions

source:LuSwinton @aol.com

_____________________________________________________


Update- Animal Sexual Abuse Arkansas Case- LETTERS NEEDED

**Alert prepared by  myREBAdog at att.net.  When forwarding this to others, please do not alter the content of the alert, including the letter/information from PeTA that is within this alert. 
  
Update:  Prosecutor Terry Harris of Garland County, Arkansas, has confirmed that there is a trial set for April 1st  regarding contempt of court charges for the case involving Derek Dunaway who was arrested and charged on Sept. 17, 2002, with one count of sodomy for his admitted attacks on his dog.  In November of 2003, Animal Services of Hot Springs confirmed that a dead dog was found at the resident of Dunaway's during his probation period, which he was previously ordered not to have any animals. 
 
The sample letter below is lengthy because it contains both background information and current information re this case.  Please be polite and personalize your own letter.  Remind the authorities that jail time is mandatory, Dunaway was given a light sentence previously with no jail time and he broke his probation by having a dead dog in his resident during his probation.   (Hot Springs Animal Services stated they found the dead dog after neighbors complained of a dog crying at Dunaway's resident).
 
Thank you.
Source: Lisa Marie
myREBAdog at att.net
 
 
More info/media:  http://www.pet-abuse.com/cases/601/AR/US/1
  
Please Contact:
 
Honorable Terri Harris - Garland County Prosecutor
501 Ouachita Avenue
Hot Springs, AR 71901
Fax:  (501) 321-2592 
Main Office Phone: (501) 321-2556
 
 
Honorable Steve Oliver - Garland County Prosecuting Attorney
501 Ouachita Avenue
Hot Springs, AR 71901
Main Office Phone: (501) 622-3720
Email: < soliver at garlandcounty.org >

 
 
Garland County Sheriff's Department 
Larry Selig - Sheriff 
Email: < ljs at garlandcounty.org >
525 Ouachita Ave. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 71901 
Main Office Phone: (501) 622-3660  
 

Dan Bugg, Supervisor

Hot Springs Animal Services 

Fax: (501) 262-2091

Email:  <dbugg at cityhs.net> 
 
Letter sent to authorities from Peta- Information: 
(the recipient's phone numbers are listed)
  

January 21, 2004 

To: The Honorable Terri Harris, Garland County Prosecutor (501-321-2556)

The Honorable David White, Prosecutor, City of Hot Springs (501-623-4023)

Sheriff Larry Selig, Garland Co. Sheriff’s Office (501-622-3660)

Chief Gary Ashcraft, Hot Springs Police Dept. (501-321-6789)

Dan Bugg, Supervisor, Hot Springs Animal Services (501-262-2091)

Mary Ann Taft, Director, Garland Co. Humane Society (501-501-538-0167)

From: Martin Mersereau, Manager, Domestic Animal Issues & Abuse Dept.

Re: Derek Dunaway, convicted animal rapist

 

Your urgent attention is requested. In October, 2002, our office was contacted by someone in reluctant e-mail contact with Hot Springs resident Derek Dunaway. During their correspondence (which harmlessly began on a “pet lovers” message board), Dunaway bragged of raping animals, and that he’d worked for, or attempted to secure employment at various local animal shelters and veterinary hospitals in order to access his victims. He also expressed his intent to advertise himself as a pet-sitting service to this end. Through extensive contact with our complainant and review of said dialogue PETA determined that our complainant’s report had merit. Local officials were contacted and, on September 17 of that year, Dunaway was charged with one count of sodomy for his admitted attacks on his dogs who—according to news reports—were found by Katherine Bolton, DVM, to be “[severely] bleeding from the colon.” He was subsequently convicted, and his sentence included a prohibition on his owning or harboring animals for one year (the second half of this prohibitive order was to run from June 6 to December 6, 2003).  

In November, 2003, Hot Springs Animal Services officers responded to a neighbor’s report of a dog screaming from the vicinity of Dunaway’s residence. When officers arrived, they reportedly found a dog in Dunaway’s custody, dead from causes unapparent. Field Services Supervisor Dan Bugg states that a necropsy was performed and that “trauma could not be ruled out.” Dunaway appears to have violated court orders by having this animal in his charge regardless, and there is some question as to whether Dunaway was in possession of other animals at the time of this investigation. 

Further, Dunaway has recently surrendered to the Garland Humane Society a female dog who was apparently in heat. A subsequent veterinary examination reportedly determined that sperm was present in the animal’s vaginal cavity. We understand that, at the request of the county prosecutor’s office, the sample in question is to be analyzed to determine its origin, animal or human, and that results are still pending.  

We are alarmed to learn that Dunaway allegedly and currently has in his charge two red Doberman pinschers, a black Labrador and a cat—at least two of these animals were given him by his father who was present during the 2002 court proceedings (Dunaway was reportedly found in possession of two Doberman pinschers at the time of his 2002 arrest, as well). On January 15, we requested that humane officials visit Dunaway’s animals with an eye for trauma consistent with non-canine penetration. However we are unable to determine if Dunaway’s dogs have in fact been examined by any law-enforcement official, last week, or ever, and would appreciate some clarification regarding such efforts if they were made at all. 

Repeat crimes among animal abusers—particularly so-called “zoophiles”—are the rule. Given this and recent events, we urge your respective offices to do whatever is necessary to ensure the welfare of all animals currently in Dunaway’s charge, to hold him accountable for any injuries sustained by same, and to expedite whatever processes are in motion to hold the suspect accountable for sentencing violations. May we suggest that the animals in question be taken into protective custody, or, if a field examination can determine the existence of swelling, tearing, bleeding or any other form of trauma, that they be seized as evidence? Surely you agree that their safety should be of utmost concern, and that any and all avenues available to secure their safety be vigorously explored?  

Please allow us to hear from you soon regarding this matter. If there is another entity to whom we should appeal for proactive assistance in this matter, please advise. 
 

Very sincerely,

Martin Mersereau, Manager

Domestic Animal Issues & Abuse Department






_________________________________________________

STAFF








Staff Editor and Contributor:Ljbeane1 at aol.com

Staff contributor and advisor:VeganRadfem at aol.com

Staff:myREBAdog at worldnet.att.net

What Jill Knows:PetBehaveConsult at aol.com 

Sled Dog Action Coalition:Glickman37 at aol.com

Michael A. Budkie :saen at worldnet.att.net 






________________________________
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